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Continuing our two day trip to Qatar

Day Two

We had been really tired the night before and after eating and drinking our fill at the Old Manor Steak House, we had gone to bed early and slept really, really well, so we were able to get up early to maximize the day. We started with a wonderful breakfast at our hotel. I say wonderful because, while I eat nothing at all for breakfast when I am at home, when I am on holiday, I really enjoy main course style breakfasts. Here I had small quantities of chicken curry, vegetable curry, daal, rice and cheese borek. My husband had cereal, bread and cheese - how boring!!! Though to be fair he did also try the lentil soup.

In the breakfast room.

In the breakfast room.

Suitably full, we ventured out. We headed back towards Souq Waqif. I liked the look of the building in the distance with its spiral minaret. This turned out to be the mosque of the Islamic Cultural Centre.

Looking towards the Islamic Cultural Centre.

Looking towards the Islamic Cultural Centre.

This time we visited Al Koot Fort which is located nearby the market area. This fort was built in 1927 by Sheikh Abdullah bin Jassim Al Thani, who ruled Qatar from 1913 until 1949. Apparently it is now a museum, but it was closed when we visited.

Al Koot Fort.

Al Koot Fort.

At the far end of the market we found an interesting square with a replica of an old Qatari well.

The old well.

The old well.

We also viewed the Islamic Cultural Centre from closer up before heading off to the corniche. We had to pass through a lovely green park area to reach the Corniche.

The Islamic Cultural Centre.

The Islamic Cultural Centre.

Park.

Park.

The Corniche is a seven kilometre long waterfront promenade. Obviously we only walked part of it. There were wonderful views of wooden sailing dhows and the distant skyline of the central business district. There is also a huge sculpture of an open oyster with a pearl inside it. Prior to the 1940s pearl diving was a major industry in Qatar.

Doha Corniche.

Doha Corniche.

Doha Corniche.

Doha Corniche.

Oyster and Pearl.

Oyster and Pearl.

Oyster and Pearl.

Oyster and Pearl.

Doha Corniche.

Doha Corniche.

Doha Corniche.

Doha Corniche.

Doha Corniche.

Doha Corniche.

Doha Corniche

Doha Corniche

We headed along the Corniche in the direction of the very impressive Museum of Islamic Arts Building. This was designed by the Chinese American architect I. M. Pei when he was ninety-one years old. The museum is built on an island near the traditional dhow harbour. Entry to the museum is free. The museum is home to manuscripts, carpets, ceramics, weapons, jewellery and paintings. These items come from Spain, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Turkey, India, and Central Asia. The exterior and interior of the building are both absolutely wonderful to see.

Museum of Islamic Arts.

Museum of Islamic Arts.

Museum of Islamic Arts.

Museum of Islamic Arts.

Inside the museum.

Inside the museum.

Inside the museum.

Inside the museum.

Inside the museum.

Inside the museum.

Inside the museum.

Inside the museum.

Museum of Islamic Art.

Museum of Islamic Art.

Outside the museum there was another interesting fountain made of water pots.

Fountain.

Fountain.

After visiting the museum we strolled along the Corniche more then wandered through the park near the Corniche towards the parliament building and the clock tower. We got told off for going too close to this so crossed the road away from it then found some Arabian horses and the Falcon Souq.

The Corniche.

The Corniche.

The Corniche.

The Corniche.

The Corniche.

The Corniche.

The Corniche.

The Corniche.

Parliament, Clock Tower and Mosque.

Parliament, Clock Tower and Mosque.

Parliament, Clock Tower and Mosque.

Parliament, Clock Tower and Mosque.

Park and Islamic Cultural Centre.

Park and Islamic Cultural Centre.

Horses.

Horses.

Falcon Souq.

Falcon Souq.

Falcon Souq.

Falcon Souq.

Gold Souq.

Gold Souq.

Market at night.

Market at night.

Dinner.

Dinner.

Then we wandered back through the market at night and home in the dark , which was not easy as the construction near the hotel had taken over the pavements and we had to walk on a rather busy road in the dark. Not a lot of fun, but we survived it. Once we were home, we ate in the same restaurant as the night before.

I am already looking forward to our next visit to Doha, as there is lots more to see and we enjoyed this initial trip very much.

Posted by irenevt 01:11 Archived in Qatar

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Comments

A fascinating mix of old and modern!

by ToonSarah

We were very pleased and surprised by Qatar. Looking forward to visiting it again. All the best, Irene

by irenevt

Interesting to see a place whose airport is all that I have visited.

by ADAMYAMEY

Now they have lifted visa restrictions for many nationalities. If you get the chanceto go, it is worth seeing.

by irenevt

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